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Caleb Bell
Caleb Bell

The Rising Force: The Beginning of Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon's Adventures in the Star Wars Galaxy


The Rising Force: A Review of the First Book in the Star Wars Jedi Apprentice Series




If you are a fan of Star Wars, you might be familiar with the Jedi Apprentice series, a collection of young adult novels that explore the early years of Obi-Wan Kenobi and his master Qui-Gon Jinn. The first book in this series, The Rising Force, was published in 1999 and written by Dave Wolverton. In this article, I will review this book and share my thoughts on its plot, characters, themes, and style. I will also provide some interesting facts and trivia about the book and its author.




The Rising Force (Star Wars Jedi Apprentice Book 1)



What is the Star Wars Jedi Apprentice Series?




The Star Wars Jedi Apprentice series is a set of 18 books that chronicle the adventures of Obi-Wan Kenobi and Qui-Gon Jinn before the events of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. The series was published by Scholastic Inc. from 1999 to 2002 and aimed at readers aged 10 and up. The first 11 books were written by Dave Wolverton, while the rest were written by Jude Watson.


The premise and the setting of the series




The series takes place in a galaxy far, far away, where a democratic republic called the Galactic Republic is threatened by various enemies, such as pirates, slavers, criminals, warlords, and rogue planets. To maintain peace and justice, the Republic is aided by an ancient order of warriors called the Jedi Knights, who use their mystical powers called the Force to protect the innocent and fight for good.


The series focuses on one particular Jedi Knight, Qui-Gon Jinn, and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi. Qui-Gon is a wise and powerful Jedi who follows his own intuition rather than strict rules. Obi-Wan is a young and talented Jedi who struggles to balance his loyalty to his master with his obedience to the Jedi Council. Together, they travel across the galaxy to complete various missions assigned by the Council, such as negotiating treaties, resolving conflicts, investigating crimes, and stopping evil plots.


The main characters and their relationships




The main characters of the series are Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. They are both complex and dynamic characters who grow and change throughout their adventures.


Qui-Gon Jinn is a respected and experienced Jedi Knight who has a strong connection to the living Force. He is often rebellious and unconventional in his methods, which sometimes puts him at odds with other Jedi or authority figures. He is also compassionate and generous, willing to help those in need regardless of their status or affiliation. He has a troubled past that haunts him and makes him reluctant to take on a new apprentice.


Obi-Wan Kenobi is a promising and eager Jedi Padawan who has a lot of potential and ambition. He is loyal and respectful to his master, but also curious and adventurous. He is often impatient and impulsive, which sometimes leads him to trouble or danger. He is also brave and noble, willing to sacrifice himself for others or for a greater cause. He has a strong desire to prove himself and become a Jedi Knight.


The relationship between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan is the core of the series. It starts off as a rocky and uncertain one, as they are both unsure if they are compatible as master and apprentice. They have different personalities, opinions, and styles, which often cause them to clash or disagree. However, as they face various challenges and enemies together, they gradually develop a bond of trust, respect, and friendship. They learn from each other, support each other, and complement each other.


The themes and the messages of the series




The series explores various themes and messages that are relevant to both the Star Wars universe and the real world. Some of these themes and messages are:



  • The importance of balance: The series shows how the Force is a source of life and power that can be used for good or evil, depending on the user's intentions and actions. It also shows how the Jedi must balance their emotions, their duties, their attachments, and their individuality.



  • The value of diversity: The series features a variety of characters from different species, cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives. It shows how they can enrich each other's lives, learn from each other's experiences, and cooperate for a common goal.



  • The challenge of choice: The series presents many situations where the characters have to make difficult choices that have consequences for themselves and others. It shows how they have to weigh their options, consider their values, and face their fears.



  • The power of friendship: The series highlights the bond between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan as well as other allies they meet along the way. It shows how friendship can provide comfort, guidance, inspiration, and strength in times of need.



What is the plot of The Rising Force?




The Rising Force is the first book in the series and it introduces the main characters and their initial conflict. The book has three main parts: the introduction and the conflict, the rising action and the challenges, and the climax and the resolution.


The introduction and the conflict




The book begins with Obi-Wan Kenobi leaving the Jedi Temple on Coruscant after failing to find a master who would take him as an apprentice. He is about to turn 13 years old, which is the age limit for becoming a Padawan. He feels disappointed and angry at himself for not being good enough for any of the Jedi Masters he met.


Meanwhile, Qui-Gon Jinn is on a mission to stop a rogue planet called Ona Nobis from joining the Trade Federation, a powerful organization that exploits weaker planets for profit. He infiltrates Ona Nobis's palace and confronts her in her throne room. However, he is ambushed by her guards and captured. He manages to escape by using his lightsaber and his Force abilities, but he is wounded in the process.


Qui-Gon returns to Coruscant to report his failure to the Jedi Council. He also learns that he has been assigned a new apprentice: Obi-Wan Kenobi. He is surprised and reluctant to accept this assignment, as he does not want to train another Padawan after his previous one died in his arms. He also does not think that Obi-Wan is suitable for him, as he senses that Obi-Wan is too proud and reckless.


Obi-Wan is also shocked and reluctant to accept this assignment, as he does not want to leave the Jedi Order and join the Agricultural Corps on Bandomeer, a barren planet where he would work as a farmer. He also does not think that Qui-Gon is suitable for him, as he senses that Qui-Gon is too distant and cold.


However, both Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan have no choice but to follow the Council's decision. They meet each other for the first time at the spaceport, where they board a transport ship called the Monument that will take them to Bandomeer. They do not get along well with each other, as they have different opinions on how to deal with various situations on board.


The rising action and the challenges




The book continues with Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan facing various challenges on their way to Bandomeer. These challenges test their skills, their morals, and their relationship.


The rising action and the challenges




The book continues with Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan facing various challenges on their way to Bandomeer. These challenges test their skills, their morals, and their relationship.


One of these challenges is dealing with the conflict between three groups of miners who are also passengers on the Monument: the Hutts, the Whiphids, and the Arconans. The Hutts are a greedy and ruthless species who control most of the mining operations in the galaxy. The Whiphids are a furry and fierce species who work as hired muscle for the Hutts. The Arconans are a reptilian and secretive species who have a rare ability to sense minerals. The three groups hate each other and often fight over resources, territory, and profits.


Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan try to mediate between the miners and prevent violence from breaking out. However, they have different approaches to doing so. Qui-Gon prefers to use diplomacy and negotiation, while Obi-Wan prefers to use force and intimidation. They also have different opinions on who to trust and who to help. Qui-Gon sympathizes with the Arconans, who are oppressed and exploited by the Hutts. Obi-Wan sympathizes with the Whiphids, who are loyal and honorable despite their brutish appearance.


Another challenge is dealing with the threat of pirates who attack the Monument in space. The pirates are led by a mysterious woman named Ona Nobis, who is actually the same rogue planet that Qui-Gon failed to stop earlier. She has a personal vendetta against Qui-Gon and wants to kill him. She also wants to steal the valuable cargo that the Monument is carrying: a shipment of ionite, a rare mineral that can power starships.


Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan try to defend the Monument and its crew from the pirates. However, they have to overcome their own weaknesses and fears. Qui-Gon has to face his guilt and grief over his previous apprentice's death, which Ona Nobis exploits by taunting him. Obi-Wan has to face his insecurity and doubt over his abilities as a Jedi, which Ona Nobis exploits by tempting him.


The climax and the resolution




The book reaches its climax when the Monument crash-lands on an uninhabited planet called Phindar after being damaged by the pirate attack. The planet is covered by a toxic fog that blocks communication and navigation. The survivors of the crash have to work together to find a way off the planet before they run out of supplies or succumb to the fog.


Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan take charge of leading the survivors to safety. They also have to confront Ona Nobis, who has survived the crash as well and is still hunting them down. They finally face her in a climactic duel, where they use their lightsabers and their Force powers to fight her.


The book ends with a resolution that wraps up the main conflict and sets up the next book in the series. Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan manage to defeat Ona Nobis and escape from Phindar with the help of a Republic cruiser that responds to their distress signal. They also manage to resolve their differences and agree to become master and apprentice. They decide to continue their journey to Bandomeer, where they hope to find peace and harmony.


What are the strengths and weaknesses of The Rising Force?




The Rising Force is a well-written and entertaining book that has many strengths and weaknesses. Here are some of them:


The strengths: the writing style, the character development, the action scenes, and the moral dilemmas




One of the strengths of The Rising Force is its writing style. The author uses clear and simple language that is easy to read and understand. He also uses vivid descriptions that create a sense of immersion in the Star Wars universe. He captures the tone and atmosphere of each scene, whether it is tense, exciting, humorous, or emotional.


Another strength of The Rising Force is its character development. The author creates realistic and relatable characters that have distinct personalities, motivations, flaws, and growth arcs. He shows how Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan change throughout their adventures, how they learn from their mistakes, how they overcome their challenges, and how they form a bond with each other.


A third strength of The Rising Force is its action scenes. The author writes thrilling and engaging action scenes that keep the reader hooked and on the edge of their seat. He uses a variety of settings, weapons, enemies, and strategies to make each action scene unique and unpredictable. He also balances the action scenes with quieter moments that allow the characters and the reader to breathe and reflect.


A fourth strength of The Rising Force is its moral dilemmas. The author presents complex and realistic moral dilemmas that challenge the characters and the reader to think critically and ethically. He shows how the characters have to make hard choices that have consequences for themselves and others. He also shows how the characters have to deal with the gray areas of morality, where there is no clear right or wrong answer.


The weaknesses: the predictability, the lack of originality, and the slow pace




One of the weaknesses of The Rising Force is its predictability. The book follows a familiar and formulaic plot structure that is common in many Star Wars stories. The book has a clear beginning, middle, and end, with a set of obstacles and resolutions that are easy to anticipate. The book also has a few plot holes and inconsistencies that are hard to ignore.


Another weakness of The Rising Force is its lack of originality. The book borrows many elements and ideas from other Star Wars media, such as movies, comics, games, and books. The book does not offer much new or innovative content that would surprise or impress the reader. The book also relies on many clichés and stereotypes that are overused and outdated.


A third weakness of The Rising Force is its slow pace. The book takes a long time to get to the main action and conflict, spending a lot of time on exposition and backstory. The book also drags on some scenes and chapters that are not very relevant or interesting. The book could have been shorter and tighter without losing its essence or quality.


What are some interesting facts and trivia about The Rising Force?




The Rising Force is not only a fun and enjoyable book, but also a rich and informative one. Here are some interesting facts and trivia about the book and its author:


The author and his background




The author of The Rising Force is Dave Wolverton, who is also known by his pen name David Farland. He is an American author who has written over 50 novels in various genres, such as fantasy, science fiction, horror, thriller, and historical fiction. He is best known for his Runelords series, which has sold over four million copies worldwide.


Wolverton started his writing career in 1986, when he won the Writers of the Future contest, a prestigious competition for aspiring science fiction and fantasy writers. He then became a judge for the contest and a mentor for many other writers, such as Brandon Sanderson, Brandon Mull, James Dashner, and Stephenie Meyer.


Wolverton wrote the first 11 books in the Jedi Apprentice series under his real name, while he wrote his other books under his pen name David Farland. He chose to use a pen name because he wanted to avoid confusion with another science fiction author named Dave Wolverton who wrote for Star Trek.


The publication history and the reception




The Rising Force was published in 1999 by Scholastic Inc., a publishing company that specializes in children's books. It was the first book in the Jedi Apprentice series, which was one of the first Star Wars series aimed at young readers. It was also one of the first Star Wars books to focus on Obi-Wan Kenobi's backstory before he became a Jedi Knight.


The Rising Force received positive reviews from critics and readers alike. It was praised for its writing style, its character development, its action scenes, and its moral dilemmas. It was also appreciated for its contribution to the Star Wars lore and canon. It sold well and became a bestseller in several countries.


The connections and references to other Star Wars media




The Rising Force has many connections and references to other Star Wars media, such as movies, comics, games, and books. Some of these connections and references are:



  • The book takes place 44 years before the events of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, which is the first movie in the Star Wars prequel trilogy.



  • The book features several characters that appear or are mentioned in other Star Wars media, such as Yoda, Mace Windu, Ki-Adi-Mundi, Dooku, Xanatos, Tahl, Bant Eerin, Bruck Chun, Ona Nobis, Jabba the Hutt, Gardulla the Hutt, Eeth Koth, Adi Gallia, Plo Koon, Saesee Tiin,



The connections and references to other Star Wars media




The Rising Force has many connections and references to other Star Wars media, such as movies, comics, games, and books. Some of these connections and references are:



  • The book takes place 44 years before the events of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, which is the first movie in the Star Wars prequel trilogy.



  • The book features several characters that appear or are mentioned in other Star Wars media, such as Yoda, Mace Windu, Ki-Adi-Mundi, Dooku, Xanatos, Tahl, Bant Eerin, Bruck Chun, Ona Nobis, Jabba the Hutt, Gardulla the Hutt, Eeth Koth, Adi Gallia, Plo Koon, Saesee Tiin.



  • The book mentions several planets that are important or prominent in other Star Wars media, such as Coruscant, Bandomeer, Telos IV, Alderaan, Tatooine.



  • The book introduces several concepts and terms that are relevant or significant in other Star Wars media, such as the Force, the Jedi Order, the Jedi Council, the Jedi Code, the Padawan braid, the lightsaber, the Trade Federation.



  • The book foreshadows several events and developments that occur or are revealed in other Star Wars media, such as the rise of the Sith, the fall of the Jedi Order, the Clone Wars, the Galactic Empire.



Conclusion and recommendation




In conclusion, The Rising Force is a great book for Star Wars fans and young readers who enjoy science fiction and adventure stories. It is a well-written and entertaining book that has many strengths and weaknesses. It has a clear and simple writing style that is easy to read and understand. It has realistic and relatable characters that have distinct personalities and growth arcs. It has thrilling and engaging action scenes that keep the reader hooked and on the edge of their seat. It has complex and realistic moral dilemmas that challenge the characters and the reader to think critically and ethically. However, it also has a familiar and formulaic plot structure that is common in many Star Wars stories. It has a few plot holes and inconsistencies that are hard to ignore. It borrows many elements and ideas from other Star Wars media without offering much new or innovative content. It relies on many clichés and stereotypes that are overused and outdated. It takes a long time to get to the main action and conflict and drags on some scenes and chapters that are not very relevant or interesting.


I would recommend this book to anyone who likes Star Wars or wants to learn more about Obi-Wan Kenobi's backstory. I would also recommend this book to anyone who likes stories about friendship, loyalty, courage, and choice. I would not recommend this book to anyone who expects a lot of originality or surprises from a Star Wars story. I would also not recommend this book to anyone who prefers a fast-paced or complex plot from a science fiction story.


I hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful. If you want to read The Rising Force or any other book in the Jedi Apprentice series, you can find them online or at your local bookstore. May the Force be with you!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about The Rising Force:



  • Q: How many pages is The Rising Force?



  • A: The Rising Force is 176 pages long in paperback format.



  • Q: Who is the author of The Rising Force?



  • A: The author of The Rising Force is Dave Wolverton.



  • Q: When was The Rising Force published?



  • A: The Rising Force was published in 1999 by Scholastic Inc.



Q: What is the genre of The


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